Pragmatics of humor at the workplace: A case study

Author1

Charles Ofosu Marfo

Affiliation

Department of Modern Languages, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Author2

Catrin Hill

Affiliation

Institut fur Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Universität Potsdam, Germany

Abstract

This paper presents a study of how humor impact the workplace and individual creativity following the position that humor is an important part of the corporate environment and quality of human personality (e.g. Bleedorn (1987), Plester (2009)). Workers of an advertising agency are observed with regard to the use of humor and its effects on their relationship with each other. From recordings, pieces of discourse that triggered at least a smile are identified as humor following Ruch (2008), and their contents are analyzed. We also critically look into each identified humor and look at how it is used with particular attention to the initiator, the target and the butt of the humor. We ultimately endeavor to underscore the commonly held view in the literature that creativity comes to bear in a positive humorous environment of a company and that creativity is positively linked to favorable humorous surroundings at the workplace.

Keywords

humor; incongruity; workplace; creativity

Publication Date

April 1, 2015

Issue

Volume 5, Issue 1

Citation information

Marfo, Charles Ofosu, and Catrin Hill. 2015. “Pragmatics of humor at the workplace: A case study.” Language. Text. Society 5 (1): e9-e24. https://ltsj.online/2015-05-1-marfo-hill. (Journal title at the time of publication: SamaraAltLinguo E-Journal.)

BibTeX

@Article{Marfo2015,
author = {Marfo, Charles Ofosu and Hill, Catrin},
title = {{Pragmatics of humor at the workplace: A case study}},
journal = {Language. Text. Society},
year = {2015},
volume = {5},
number = {1},
pages = {9–24},
url = {https://ltsj.online/2015-05-1-marfo-hill/},
}

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